Friday, July 25, 2008

Stephen King haunts the small(er) screen


Starting Monday, July 28, mobile phone users & web surfers can enjoy Stephen King's latest work in a ground-breaking series of 25 original video episodes.

The series of video episodes were created through a unique partnership between Scribner and Simon & Schuster Digital, Marvel Entertainment, and CBS Mobile, and is believed to be the first comic-style book adaptation specifically developed and published for viewing on multiple small screen platforms.
Starting today, viewers can go to www.NisHere.com or www.simonsays.com to see a preview of the episodes, which will also be unveiled at Comic-Con International in San Diego today at a panel event featuring the creators of this pioneering venture.

The episodes are based on King's original and previously unpublished story "N.", the tale of a psychiatrist who becomes the victim of the same mysterious and deadly obsession as his patient, and which will be included in his forthcoming collection of short stories Just After Sunset (Scribner, November 11, 2008) and published as a comic book miniseries by Marvel launching in 2009.

Beginning Monday, July 28 and running through Friday, August 29 the video episodes (each running approximately two minutes), will be released in serial fashion on consecutive weekdays for five weeks, at no additional charge to mobile users, through the largest mobile carriers. As an added bonus for consumers, the episodes will also be available on the web through the CBS Audience Network, capable of reaching 92% of the U.S.-based online audience, and at www.NisHere.com. Visitors to www.NisHere.com will also be able to embed the player and videos on blogs and social networking sites, and to pre-order the book.


For the entire article, CLICK HERE.

Source: Marvel Comics



2 comments:

LimePenguin said...

I guess web serials are the new favorite marketing strategy? Still, cool news as usual!

hopefulsemblance said...

Well Marvel has decided to go the route of web serials lately. They used a lonelygirl15-esque technique to promote their Secret Invasion crossover event and gained a lot of positive buzz over it. Plus it's a way for Marvel studios to flex their creative muscles in other media.
Right now Stephen King has a multi-project deal with Marvel so... you can kinda see how A connects to B connects to C.